Hackers Unite! Alison’s Knock-Off Art

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Hackers Unite! Alison’s Knock-Off Artby househomeon.Hackers Unite! Alison’s Knock-Off ArtCan I just caveat by saying I really love art, respect artists, and appreciate that they would like money for their amazing products? I just want to throw that out there so my artist friends don’t hate me for today’s project, but y’all, art can be expensive! And we can all be artists, right? I’ll […]

Can I just caveat by saying I really love art, respect artists, and appreciate that they would like money for their amazing products? I just want to throw that out there so my artist friends don’t hate me for today’s project, but y’all, art can be expensive! And we can all be artists, right? I’ll admit, I’m a bit guilty for walking around the Tate Modern Art Museum in London playing “What could I have easily done?” in each room.

So today, I’m going to say I’m INSPIRED (not that I’m hacking) by art that I can’t afford and I’m going to try to make it for myself. Or, in this case, for my parents, whom I was visiting recently. My hacked piece inspiration? This lovely print sold at West Elm:

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Let me give the utmost respect and credit to Christine Llewellyn, the artist for this gorgeous piece….a print of which is selling for $149 at West Elm.

I know, Bert. It’s a lot of money. If you love it and can afford it, you should buy it. If you love it and can’t afford it…..read on.

While on a little vacation to Indiana, I offered to try to make something similar for my aunt’s granddaughter’s room. She provided to me this rug (she bought this – probably cheaper than I made THIS RUG for) as a color inspiration. So, I headed out to Meijer (my first time there) and got what I thought I needed.

I picked up the most expensive part of my project (this white floating frame) for $17. The rest was really inexpensive: a bag of paint brushes for about $6, a tray of watercolors for $1, 4 pieces of posterboard for $2, and I brought some painter’s tape with me, so that was free. I started by measuring out how big of picture I was looking for and cutting my posterboard to make 4 pieces (just in case one…or more…didn’t turn out right).After that, I gave it my first go. Using the MATTE side of the posterboard, I taped off a similar pattern to the image I was inspired by.

Then, with the watercolors, I played around with colors and consistencies until I thought it looked pretty good. Then I pulled off the tape to critique my first go-around. For me, it was too light, I didn’t incorporate any blue, and the space between the color triangles was too big. Also, peeling up the blue tape, I realized that the matte side of the posterboard stuck to the tape too much, and peeled up a bit. No good.

I didn’t have any blue paint on hand, so I decided to try again, fixing what I didn’t like. I was getting closer! Using the SLICK side of the posterboard fixed my issues with the tape sticking to the paper. The colors were bolder, but I still wanted some blue. Using painter’s tape cut down the middle provided a smaller barrier from one color triangle to another, which I really liked. So, my mom ransacked her closet and found a tray of watercolors that had blue in it, and I decided to go for attempt #3.

YES! Bolder colors, streaky watercolors, incorporating some blue, and small spaces between the triangles. Exactly what I was going for.

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The only thing the watercolors do is warp the paper a bit, since it’s basically paper getting wet, but in a frame, it’s not too obvious, so I didn’t mind. So what do you think? My aunt liked it, I liked it, and for all around $20, it was something fun to do that didn’t cost a lot and made a bold, bright picture for a little girl’s room.

Have you ever given a try to art hacking? Is this art sacrilege? I sure hope not!

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